Wearing all white, Drella and her clones look like ethereal drag angels.
— Sammi Lim
The models’ cool demeanor is punctured by cliquey group behavior, anxiety, and violence. Everyone exhibits some form of dependency and destructive behavior. There are catfights and breakdowns as celebrity pains take a toll on their identity.
— Dance Enthusiast

the feath3r theory presents: Andy Warhol's DRELLA (I Love you Faye Driscoll)
BLACK BY POPULAR DEMAND


June 5 + 6 @ 7:30pm
The Invisible Dog Brooklyn 
51 Bergen St. Brooklyn,NY 11201
rsvp

By RSVPing for this event you will be guaranteed seats for the performances. All others will be seated first come first served.

The Feath3r Theory Presents: Andy Warhol’s DRELLA (I Love You Faye Driscoll) Is A Movement-Based Drag Performance Essay Inspired By Andy Warhol’s Alter Ego “Drella” — A Contraction Of Dracula And Cinderella, Envisioned By Warhol Superstar Ondine. Beyond The Focus On Warhol's Legacy, Raja Feather Kelly's Interest Is In Addressing His Concerns With Identity, Sexuality And Self-Worth. In His Vogue-Ballet, Kelly Creates A Surreal World; A Gender-Bending, Race-Shifting, Multi-Medium “Artsploitation” In Response To Today’s Consumer Culture, And Celebrity Worship. It Is The Latest In The Choreographer’s Warhol-Driven Series Leading To A Final Staging Of The Feath3r Theory Presents: ‘WHO’S AFRAID OF ANDY WARHOL?’

Run Time: Approx. 70 Mins. No Intermission
Concept And Direction: Raja Feather Kelly
Original Music By Tito Ramsey
Lighting Design: Zephan Ellenbogen
Photography: Andy Toad
Filmography: Laura Snow

Original Choreography And Performance: Raja Feather Kelly With Amy Gernux, Yvonne Hernandez, Nik Owens, Rachel Pritzlaff, Rebecca Hite-Teicheira, Connor Voss And Benjamin Wolk.

Additional Performers: Yeman Brown, and Jeremy Neal.

This Piece Was Created In Part At The Bates Dance Festival's 2013 Emerging Choreographer Program and Funded in part by the Foundation for Contemporary Arts Emergency Grant Fund.


T H E    S T O R Y   O F   D R E L L A... 

Who am I, and who do I want to become are the questions I ask myself everyday. 
When I was a child, I sat in front of the television, as close as I could and turned it on Lifetime, TMC, and if it was the weekend, HBO or SHOWTIME.  As the scenes played out in front of me I would repeat them back. 

“You’re a fraud, Helen and I can see right through you” 
     “You’re a fraud, Helen and I can see right through you.”
“If you kill him, you’ll have to kill me too”
     “If you kill him, you’ll have to kill me too.”
“We have to be more Mexican than the Mexicans and more American than the Americans”
     “We have to be more Mexican than the Mexicans and more American than the Americans.”

Meryl Streep, Julianne Moore, Natalie Portman, Kevin Spacey, Denzel Washington, Jennifer Lopez, and Elizabeth Taylor were my idols. . . I looked in that black box trying to find myself, who I was, who I was going to be. 
As I got older, movies became books, and books music. I changed who I was and what I did based on what I was listening to and who I was reading. I did this for years. I am not quite certain that I have stopped. Now I can be a piece of a book, a cover of a magazine, a part of a movie and a living embodiment of a song lyric. 

           Is it the same for everyone else around me?

Whether we know it or not, our self values are often measured by how closely connected or aligned we are with popular culture, how we engage in pop culture as individuals and members of a society, producers and consumers, celebrities and fans. In my multimedia performance work I celebrate, challenge, and chastise pop culture to examine issues such as exploitation, violence, power, and privilege. I dissect pop-culture ideas drawn from photographs and music and transform them into performance in a way that subverts or overturns taken-for-granted ideas. Recently, my choreography has grown from of the ideas of Andy Warhol, drag culture, and post-modern performance practice, attempts to make visible the ideas about race, class, and gender that masquerade as authoritative and fixed and to  represent transgressive ideas and identities. 

ihe feath3r theory Presents: Andy Warhol’s: DRELLA (I love you Faye Driscoll) started after I saw Faye Driscoll’s ‘You’re Me’. When I saw this production, I was immediately inspired. I felt that Faye was was a prophet of some sort. I wanted to pay homage to her some how. For me, Faye became a celebrity at that moment; everything that I wanted to be, everything i could never be; an example of fan to celebrity. I felt enraged with confusion about who I was as a person, an artist and an evolving human being. I had feelings without names for them and in that performance they were realized. I am cartoon-king from Raplh Bakshi’s ‘Cool World’, Re-Co-directed by David Lynch and Richard Linklater. I am a mash up of everything and everyone I have come into contact with in hopes to find myself or the next best me. 

When I saw portraits of Andy Warhol in Drag, I immediately felt that the picture represented a truer part of Warhol, and a Muse that I could use to exploit a more truer part of myself. A more controversial and glamorized version of me resembling the most celebrated idea  and ideal of both the history and current SUPERSTAR.     

T H E   A E S T H E T I C 

I immediately went to long time collaborator and friend, Photographer Andy Toad and make up artist Tinna Empera and said, “Make me, DRELLA”— a contraction of Dracula and Cinderella, envisioned by Warhol Superstar Ondine. ’ I wanted to know what it would take to make me, a black guy, a replica of a white man attempting to replicate a white woman. Later, I would wonder what it would take for 9 dancers of different backgrounds to replicate a black guy, replicating a white guy attempting to replicate a white woman; the idea of the superstar.  My research laid itself in front of me: addressing concerns with identity, sexuality and self-worth in response to today’s consumer culture, and celebrity worship. 

T H E   P R O C E S S 

Laura Faure, Director of the Bates Dance Festival invited me to be a resident artist at festival the summer of 2013. and it was there that I realized the movement vocabulary for DRELLA. Taking literally the idea of DRELLA— a contraction of Dracula and Cinderella and assigning the movement styles of Vouging and Ballet  (respectfully) I mashed them together creating a Surreal World; A Gender-Bending, Race-Shifting, Multi-Medium “Artsploitation”. 

Interview with Raja Feather Kelly about the process of creating DRELLA at Bates Dance Festival. 

T H E   P R E M I E R E

The show asks if pretty white faces, red lipstick, loud music, bright lights, a dance-a-long and a sing-a-long would weave together a portrait of an activist or present the cheap side of celebrity worship.

drella-web.jpg

the feath3r theory Presents: Andy Warhol’s DRELLA (I love you Faye Driscoll)’ is a movement-based drag performance essay inspired by Andy Warhol’s alter ego “Drella” — a contraction of Dracula and Cinderella, envisioned by Warhol Superstar Ondine. Beyond the focus on Warhol's legacy, Raja Feather Kelly's interest is in addressing his concerns with identity, sexuality and self-worth. In his vogue-ballet, Kelly creates a surreal world; a gender-bending, race-shifting, multi-medium “artsploitation” in response to today’s consumer culture, and celebrity worship. It is the latest in the choreographer’s Warhol-driven series leading to a final staging of the feath3r theory presents: ‘WHO’S AFRAID OF ANDY WARHOL?’
Run Time: Approx. 70 Mins. No Intermission

Concept and Direction: Raja Feather Kelly

Original Music By Tito Ramsey
Lighting Design: Zephan Ellenbogen
Make-Up: Tinna Empera
Photography: Andy Toad
Filmography: Laura Snow
Communications and Design Manager: François Leloup-Collet

Original Choreography and Performance: Raja Feather Kelly With Amy Gernux, Yvonne Hernandez, Nik Owens, Rachel Pritzlaff, Rebecca Hite-Teicheira, Connor Voss and Benjamin Wolk. Additional performers: Jeremy Jae Neal and Yeman Brown. 


P R E S S

The new work—a "drag performance essay"—features whiteface dancers in a fusion of vogue and ballet vocabularies.

The new work—a "drag performance essay"—features whiteface dancers in a fusion of vogue and ballet vocabularies.

 In other words a very pleasant Thursday night filled with drag, smashing vogue, cabaret and ballet.

 In other words a very pleasant Thursday night filled with drag, smashing vogue, cabaret and ballet.

This show is gender-bending — and a bit mind-bending, too.

This show is gender-bending — and a bit mind-bending, too.

Baring their legs, the six dancers perform splits and high kicks that would put the perkiest cheerleader to shame.

Baring their legs, the six dancers perform splits and high kicks that would put the perkiest cheerleader to shame.


A P P E A R A N C E S 

click here for more info.   


click here for more info. 

 

Shane Shane Prezentz:
FANCY: STUDS

Featuring A SNEAK PREVIEW Of The Hussy's New Music Video "STUDS IN LOVE" Featuring Alotta McGriddles Princess McSherry And Oddly Enough Directed By Shane O'Neill!

With Live Performances From:

--------------
\|/DRELLA\|/
--------------
\|/B0TT0MS\|/
--------------
\|/ ADRIENNE ANENOME \|/
--------------
\|/ PEARL HUNTER \|/
--------------
\|/ THOMAS BARRANCA \|/
--------------
And A Possible Cameo From Shane's Mom!!
 


Click here to view and download full size images.